CHURCH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Seven Deadly Sins of Church Announcements

on November 16 | in Uncategorized | by | with 1 Comment

Church announcements can often ruin a great worship service by their placement and/or the way they are presented. I once took a band to lead worship in a church in another country. Their worship service normally had about 15-20 minutes of announcements just before the sermon! I can’t imagine many ways better to kill the spirit. The announcements should be really limited to the most important items that pertain to a large portion of the church and should be done at the beginning or at the end of the service so as to not interrupt the flow of the service.

Thom Rainer, president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources, recently published a list of “deadly sins” for church announcements. Think through ways you can improve (or remove) these times in your church’s worship services.

Have you ever had a cringe moment listening to church announcements?

Most of you are probably nodding your head affirmatively.

So what are the biggest factors in bad church announcements? Here are seven of the deadliest:

  1. Not beginning on time. Most church announcements precede the worship service. If they begin late, the entire service is thrown out of kilter.
  2. Not being scripted. It is best for the person making announcements to have a verbatim script that he or she has rehearsed. For the more accomplished speakers, detailed notes are a minimum.
  3. Going too long. Announcements should be crisp, clear, and brief. Don’t take time away from prayer, music, and preaching in the worship service.
  4. Trying to be funny. Church announcements are not the place to try your infamous humor. And don’t try to tell jokes. You will go too long and the jokes will probably fall flat.
  5. Speaking in code. Here is an example of an announcement made in code: “The MYPL will meet in Santuck 183 instead of their regular place. If you have any questions, you can ask Dorothy who will be at her usual spot after the service.” Here is a clear test to make sure you aren’t speaking in code: Could a first-time guest understand exactly what you are saying if they knew nothing about your church?
  6. Asking others for information in the announcements. Have you ever been in a church service where the person making announcements says something like these words: “Hey, Jim, how long do you think your meeting will last on Monday night?” Cringe moment. Awkward moment. Bad announcements.
  7. Taking personal privilege. I once spoke at a church where the man making announcements decided “to take a moment of personal privilege.” He then proceeded to tell us about his double hernia surgery, and how grateful he was for the prayers. He even got choked up and had to pause for an interminable moment. Don’t get me wrong. The sentiment was nice. And hernias are nothing to laugh about. Especially double hernias. But the announcements were really not the place and time for his comments.

Some churches are avoiding the “announcements risk” by eliminating them altogether. Instead they are keeping announcements confined to the newsletter, website, emails, or texts. Other churches have video announcements, either recorded in house or by an outside firm.

What are your experiences on church announcements?

Seven Deadly Sins of Church Announcements @thomrainer Click To Tweet

This article was originally published at ThomRainer.com on October 17, 2016Thom S. Rainer serves as president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources. Among his greatest joys are his family: his wife Nellie Jo; three sons, Sam,  Art, and Jess; and seven grandchildren. Dr. Rainer can be found on Twitter @ThomRainer and at facebook.com/Thom.S.Rainer. Reprinted with permission.

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One Response

  1. Jim Wrenn says:

    We’ve struggled with this for a number of years now. Based on what I experienced at a conference a few yers back, I wold favor video announcements. This church had a very well produced and filmed sequence titled, “80 Seconds Around the Church”. It would take good production people to make this happen, but if you can, I’d recommend it. By the way, we haven’t done it yet.

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